Author archive for leonard slatkin

  • Slatkin Arrives in Lyon to Conduct Two Programs

    October 19, 2021

    Leonard Slatkin is back in Europe for the first time since the global pandemic began, conducting Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 8, Rabaud’s La Procession nocturne, and John Williams’s Five Sacred Trees with the Orchestre National de Lyon.

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  • Slatkin Conducts Two World Premieres in Detroit

    October 15, 2021

    Music Director Laureate Leonard Slatkin returns to the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, conducting Tchaikovsky’s Fifth Symphony and two world premieres: Samuel Adler’s Mirror Images and Joseph Schwantner’s Violin Concerto with soloist Yevgeny Kutick.

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  • “Made in America” with SLSO at Powell Hall

    October 7, 2021

    St. Louis Symphony Orchestra’s Conductor Laureate Leonard Slatkin takes the stage this weekend for a program that travels backwards in time to get three very different views of America. The performances on October 9 and 10 feature Joan Tower’s Made in America, William Bolcom’s Violin Concerto with soloist David Halen, and Béla Bartók’s Concerto for Orchestra.

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  • OCTOBER 2021

    Excitement was in the air, anticipation was high, and apprehension abounded. This was how the new season of music began in a time of confusion. Everyone had so hoped that we would be back to what we knew before the pandemic, but caution remained the watchword of the day.

    I reflected on what has brought us to this point as I looked over my itinerary for the remainder of the year. Instead of the usual “What time does the flight depart?” question, it was more like, “When should we decide if we are going or not?”

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  • Slatkin Launches New Book, “Classical Crossroads”

    September 13, 2021

    This week marks the publication of Leonard’s third book, Classical Crossroads: The Path Forward for Music in the 21st Century, available September 15 from Rowman & Littlefield and anywhere books are sold.

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  • Slatkin Premieres “Brahmsiana” with The Orchestra Now

    September 16, 2021

    Leonard Slatkin will lead the world premiere of Brahmsiana, his arrangement of Brahms melodies, with The Orchestra Now (TŌN) at Bard College’s Fisher Center, September 18-19, 2021.

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  • SEPTEMBER 2021: Birthday Edition

    Birthdays seem to come more frequently these days. And those of the past are getting more difficult to remember. Where was I last year at this time? There were certainly lots of well-wishers, and my inbox was fuller than usual.

    77 is a number that conjures up nothing. Okay, there was that TV show (77 Sunset Strip) and song from back in the late Fifties, but as far as anniversaries go, it is just a blip on the birthday radar.

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  • AUGUST 2021: A Tale of Two Orchestras

    As the summer broiled along, I participated in two music festivals. Both involved a combination of professional and student musicians, but that was pretty much where the similarities ended.

    I have been going to Aspen since 1964, and it is safe to say that my path as a conductor began there. Much has changed. There were no traffic lights back then. At one time, the festival comprised just three shows a week; now it features as many as three a day. During my time as a student, there was only one orchestra. They played a single concert each week, led exclusively by the music director. The student body was around 150 when I attended and today includes hundreds more.

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  • Author Event: An Evening with Leonard Slatkin

    August 2, 2021

    Tickets are now on sale for the St. Louis County Library’s Author Series kickoff event—a special evening with Leonard Slatkin. Slatkin will discuss his third book, Classical Crossroads: The Path Forward for Music in the 21st Century, with John Clare, CEO and general manager at Classic 107.3 FM.

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  • JULY 2021: Season Rollout Edition

    Most of you who read these monthly musings know that I am big on preserving the heritage and legacy of composers from the United States. Our tradition is rich and full. There was a time when many of these creators were heroes, part of the ongoing march of cultural history.

    It is important to understand what orchestras are doing next season and more importantly, why they are doing it. Some programming decisions needed to change in light of what we have experienced over this past year and a half. Placing emphasis on female performers and composers is long overdue, and pretty much every orchestra has recognized this, at least for the 2021-22 season. The same is true for musicians from minority communities. Black artists have, in some cases, been absent from programming aside from special observances placing them all together on a single concert. We should applaud the boards, staffs, and musicians who are working to balance the scales.

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